1-1 | Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

Book Review

Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

Richard Louv
Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books, 2006. Notes, suggested reading, index. 334 pp. $13.95 paper. ISBN: 9781565125223

The Dangerous Book for Boys

Conn and Hal Iggulden
New York: HarperCollins, 2007. Drawings, photographs, charts. 270 pp. $24.95 cloth. ISBN: 9780061243585

by Jay Mechling

First Paragraph:

The tradition of making claims about threats to American children began in the late nineteenth century, when a groupof professional “child savers” emerged to campaign for policies and programs meant to protect children from the ravages of modern cities and of modern industrial capitalism. That tradition remained strong through the twentieth century, and as the culture wars heated up in the 1980s, many of the battles were fought over children. Worried adults came to see children as vulnerable prey, and Neil Postman’s provocative book, The Disappearance of Childhood (1982), condensed adults’ concerns by blaming the mass media and commodity capitalism for the loss of an innocent time of life. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, many claims were made about threats to
children, from predatory marketing to children to sexual predators on the Internet.