1-1 | The Power of Play: How Spontaneous, Imaginative Activities Lead to Happier, Healthier Children

Book Review

The Power of Play: How Spontaneous, Imaginative Activities Lead to Happier, Healthier Children

David Elkind
Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2008. Notes, other references, index. 240 pp. $24.00 cloth. ISBN: 9780738211107

by Thomas Armstrong

First Paragraph:

The real power of David Elkind's new book The Power of Play lies in the fact that it takes us inside the mind of one of the greatest developmental thinkers of our time. A disciple of Jean Piaget, Elkind was a key figure in the resurgence of the Swiss psychologist's work in America in the 1960s and 1970s. In the 1980s and 1990s, Elkind turned his explorations toward social critique, indicting our modern, fastpaced, technological society for pushing children out of childhood too quickly. The hurried-child syndrome is his legacy from that period. Now, in The Power of Play, Elkind brings these two facets of his work together—along with his experience as a Freudian-influenced clinician, a teacher, a father, and a grandfather—influenced clinician, a teacher, a father, and a grandfather—to give us a rich and varied perspective on the value of play for our postmodern era.