4-2 | People Make Play: The Impact of Staffed Play Provision on Children, Families and Communities

Book Review

People Make Play: The Impact of Staffed Play Provision on Children, Families and Communities

Joost Beunderman
London: National Children’s Bureau, 2010. Contents, illustrations, references, bibliography. 100 pp. $15.75 paper. ISBN: 9781905818525

by Shelly Newstead

First Paragraph:

This well-written and beautifully produced research report presents six, staffed open-access play services in England. “Open access,” as it is generally used in the United Kingdom, refers to staffed play provision where children come and go as they please. While not uncommon, it has become more difficult to offer this service to children in recent years due to changes in legislation. People Make Play records the views and experiences of the children, parents, and staff involved, and it details how open-access provision operates from these different perspectives. Those of us in playwork so frequently assume such details are self-evident that we do not record them. Yet, these details often distinguish the unique nature of playwork. The strength of this report, therefore, lies in its optimistic reporting of an endangered form of play provision, and it will be of particular interest to those outside the playwork field for whom open access can still be something of a curiosity.