4-4 | Indo Caribbean Immigrant Beliefs about Play and Its Impact on Early Academic Performance

Article

Indo Caribbean Immigrant Beliefs about Play and Its Impact on Early Academic Performance

Jaipaul L. Roopnarine and Bora Jin

Abstract:

In this study, the authors use psycho-cultural models of ethnic parental theories and acculturation to look at Indo Caribbean immigrant beliefs concerning the relationship between the amount of time children play and their early academic performance. During home interviews, fifty-seven Indo Caribbean couples offered their opinions about the importance of play for childhood development and estimated the amount of time their children both played and studied at home. The authors then tested each child for early academic performance using the Kaufman Survey of Early Academic and Language Skills. Mothers and fathers held discrepant beliefs about the value of play, and maternal beliefs about the cognitive benefit of play affected the relationship between the amount of time children play and their cognitive performance. The authors discuss the data in the context of immigrant acculturation and the impact the roles of parent and child have on determining the associations between play and childhood achievement. Key words: ethnicity and child rearing; immigrant acculturation; Indo Caribbean peoples; parental attitudes about play; play and early academic performance.